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Event Type: In-person Congress (also live-streamed online)
Date: From Friday 30 September to Sunday 2 October 2022
Time: From 09:30 to 18:30, Italian time (CET)
Venue: Auditorium Antonianum, Viale Manzoni, 1 , 00185 Rome, Italy.
Language:   English (with simultaneous translation available for the Italian-speaking participants).

Attachment and Trauma: Effective Clinical Interventions and Research

PRICE

£210.00

DATE

In Person Congress in Rome
(+ streamed online)
30 September - 2 October 2022

TIME

9:30 to 18:30 CET (Italian Time)
8:30 – 17:30 BST (UK Time)
3:30 – 12:30 ET (US Eastern Time)

CPD/CE credits

Sale!

Event Type: In-person Congress (also live-streamed online)
Date: From Friday 30 September to Sunday 2 October 2022
Time: From 09:30 to 18:30, Italian time (CET)
Venue: Auditorium Antonianum, Viale Manzoni, 1 , 00185 Rome, Italy.
Language:   English (with simultaneous translation available for the Italian-speaking participants).

In recent decades, the growing synergy between increasingly innovative research methods – developed thanks to neuroscientific discoveries – and respective clinical applications has significantly contributed to the achievement of important advances in psychotherapy. If, on the one hand, neuroscientific research has become increasingly sophisticated and precise, allowing Experts to identify new brain functions and new interactions between different areas of our brain, clinical studies , on the other hand, have examined both possible fields application of research that the most effective therapeutic interventions to address psychopathology and promote the psychophysical well-being of the individual.

The increasingly in-depth knowledge about trauma and its effects not only on the brain, but also on human behavior, emotions, cognitions and social interactions are considerably broadening the horizons both in research and in clinical settings. highlighting the need to conceive man as a whole, as the result of the combination of life experiences, genetic predispositions, temperament, cultural and educational aspects.

Today, trauma-focused clinical interventions have the potential to consolidate their effectiveness based on the latest neuroscientific findings. From the intergenerational transmission of traumatic events described by epigenetics to the brain changes induced by reparative therapeutic interventions, the correlation between clinical and research studies opens the way to new treatment outcomes as yet unexplored, increasing the chances of recovery from psychopathology.

The ninth edition of the famous “Attachment and Trauma” Congress, organized by the Institute of Cognitive Sciences , will offer the opportunity to integrate the most innovative aspects of neuroscientific research studies into the most effective clinical interventions. The Congress will also aim to foster a more focused understanding of how trauma can compromise the healthy development not only of the individual but also of entire communities, and of how traumatic experiences can be healed in a profound and lasting way.

After two years marked by the difficulties caused by the pandemic, the “Attachment and Trauma” Congress finally returns to Rome : on the stage of the prestigious Auditorium Antonianum, a few steps from the Colosseum, internationally renowned experts will once again go up, ready to offer a complete and varied overview on neuroscience research and clinical practice in the treatment of trauma and attachment disorders.

The Congress will also be broadcast in live streaming, allowing the online participation of all those who cannot (or prefer to avoid) attend in person. The video recording of the Congress will be available for purchase on the Institute of Cognitive Sciences website and accessible without time limits.

In addition to being an important training opportunity, the ninth edition of the “Attachment and Trauma” Congress will be a precious moment of meeting and sharing for all mental health professionals who, tired of following online courses, feel the need to rediscover their colleagues in person and live an enriching and engaging training experience.

TRAINING information

In recent decades, the growing synergy between increasingly innovative research methods – developed thanks to neuroscientific discoveries – and respective clinical applications has significantly contributed to the achievement of important advances in psychotherapy. If, on the one hand, neuroscientific research has become increasingly sophisticated and precise, allowing Experts to identify new brain functions and new interactions between different areas of our brain, clinical studies , on the other hand, have examined both possible fields application of research that the most effective therapeutic interventions to address psychopathology and promote the psychophysical well-being of the individual.

The increasingly in-depth knowledge about trauma and its effects not only on the brain, but also on human behavior, emotions, cognitions and social interactions are considerably broadening the horizons both in research and in clinical settings. highlighting the need to conceive man as a whole, as the result of the combination of life experiences, genetic predispositions, temperament, cultural and educational aspects.

Today, trauma-focused clinical interventions have the potential to consolidate their effectiveness based on the latest neuroscientific findings. From the intergenerational transmission of traumatic events described by epigenetics to the brain changes induced by reparative therapeutic interventions, the correlation between clinical and research studies opens the way to new treatment outcomes as yet unexplored, increasing the chances of recovery from psychopathology.

The ninth edition of the famous “Attachment and Trauma” Congress, organized by the Institute of Cognitive Sciences , will offer the opportunity to integrate the most innovative aspects of neuroscientific research studies into the most effective clinical interventions. The Congress will also aim to foster a more focused understanding of how trauma can compromise the healthy development not only of the individual but also of entire communities, and of how traumatic experiences can be healed in a profound and lasting way.

After two years marked by the difficulties caused by the pandemic, the “Attachment and Trauma” Congress finally returns to Rome : on the stage of the prestigious Auditorium Antonianum, a few steps from the Colosseum, internationally renowned experts will once again go up, ready to offer a complete and varied overview on neuroscience research and clinical practice in the treatment of trauma and attachment disorders.

The Congress will also be broadcast in live streaming, allowing the online participation of all those who cannot (or prefer to avoid) attend in person. The video recording of the Congress will be available for purchase on the Institute of Cognitive Sciences website and accessible without time limits.

In addition to being an important training opportunity, the ninth edition of the “Attachment and Trauma” Congress will be a precious moment of meeting and sharing for all mental health professionals who, tired of following online courses, feel the need to rediscover their colleagues in person and live an enriching and engaging training experience.

Timetable

Friday 30 September

9.15 – 9.30   Open
9.30 – 11.00   Suzette Boon: “Self-harm and suicidal ideation in patients with complex dissociative disorders: attachment, shame and dysregulation”
11.00 – 11.15   Break
11.15 – 12.45   Mary Jo Barrett: “The Model of Collaborative Change: a relational model that exploits the natural process of change ”
12:45 – 14:00 Lunch break
14.00 – 15.30  Diana Fosha:”Stay on this, stay with me: dissolve loneliness and elaborate the profound relational experience in an experiential way to transform the trauma”
15.30 – 15.45 Break
15.45 – 17.15  Roger Solomon (online – intervention live on Zoom): “Desensitization and reworking through eye movements (EMDR) and traumatic attachment”
17.15 – 18.30  Closing panel

Saturday 1 October

9.30 – 11.00  Vincenzo Caretti: “Psychotherapy of emotional and psychosomatic regulation”
11.00 – 11.15  Break
11.15 – 12.45  Elizabeth Warner:”The transformation of trauma in children and adolescents: an embodied approach to somatic regulation, to the processing of trauma and the construction of attachment”
12:45 – 14:00  Lunch break
14.00 – 15.30  Jonathan Baylin:”Reverse relational learning: a neuroscientific approach to help the most distrustful children to trust carers ”
15.30 – 15.45  Break
15.45 – 17.15  Skip Rizzo: “Virtual reality and new advances in the field of prevention, assessment and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder ”
17.15 – 18.30  Closing panel

Sunday 2 October

9.30 – 11.00  Alessandro Carmelita and/or Marina Cirio: “ Mindful Interbeing Mirror Therapy: Beyond Healing From Trauma”
11.00 – 11.15  Break
11.15 – 12.45  Ron Siegel: “Mindfulness and compassion in the treatment of trauma: adapting the practice to person”
12:45 – 14:00  Lunch break
14.00 – 15.30  Christiane Sanderson: “Adopting an informed approach to trauma in working with survivors of child sexual abuse”
15.30 – 15.45  Break
15.45 – 17.15  Deb Dana (online – live talk on Zoom): “In search of connection: a therapeutic approach based on the Polyvagal Theory”
17.15 – 18.30  Final panel

Suzette Boon

Suzette A. Boon, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and Psychotherapist specializing in the treatment of chronic trauma and dissociative disorders. You have translated and validated the Dutch version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disordersor SCID-D) and obtained his doctorate in 1993 with a thesis on “Multiple Personality Disorder in the Netherlands”. You have published several books, chapters and articles on both the diagnosis and treatment of dissociative disorders and have devised a specific manual for patients with complex dissociative disorder to help them develop specific skills. The Italian version of the manual, “Traumatic dissociation – Understanding and facing it”, which he wrote together with Kathy Steele and Onno van der Hart, was published by Mimesis in 2013. Dr. Boon also created a new Semi-structured interview for complex dissociative disorders and trauma-related symptoms, entitled ” Trauma and Dissociation Symptoms Interviewor TADS-I). An Interview Evaluation Study has just begun. Suzette Boon is also co-author of the book “The cure for traumatic dissociation. A practical and integrative approach “(Steele, Boon & Van der Hart, 2017), thanks to which she was awarded the Pierre Janet prize awarded by the ISSTD in 2017. she currently works as a Trainer and Supervisor in several European countries and also has a studio private. She is also co-founder of the European Society for Trauma and Dissociation, ESTD), of which she was the first President. The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD) awarded her the David Caul Memorial Award in 1993, as well as the Morton Prince Award in 1994. In 1995, it awarded her the status of full member of the Society, recognizing its important contribution to the diagnosis, treatment, research and study in the field of dissociative disorders. In 2009 she received the Life Time Achievement Awardand, in 2011, the Pierre Janet prize for the book “Traumatic dissociation – Understanding and facing it”. In 2017 she received the Pierre Janet award again as co-author of the book “The cure for traumatic dissociation. A practical and integrative approach “. For more information, please visit: www.suzetteboon.com .

Self-harm and suicidal ideation in patients with complex dissociative disorders: attachment, shame and dysregulation

Patients with trauma-related complex dissociative disorders usually present with numerous symptoms, including depression and suicidality, both potentially accompanied by severe forms of self-harm. These symptoms often constitute the main problem reported by the patient, while the dissociative disorder causing the symptoms remains unidentified. When the therapist feels the need to “save” the patient, this symptomatology can put enormous pressure on the therapeutic relationship. This intervention will analyze the reasons behind the self-injurious and suicidal behavior in this type of patient, the dynamics related to transference and countertransference, also illustrating different ways to help the patient to put an end to these behaviors. Self-harm and suicidality could be related to various factors such as shame, abandonment, despair, the desire to be seen and understood by others, fear of realizing what really happened in the past, and / or purposeful strategies to manage intolerable emotions. Treatment often includes the use of antidepressants, somatic approaches, as well as cognitive-behavioral approaches often used to analyze and change related negative cognitions. However, the more complex the dissociation of the personality, the less benefit these patients can derive from the use of these techniques, as emotions and cognitions are often “contained” within different dissociated parts of the personality and are perceived. as ego-dystonic.

Mary Jo Barrett

Mary Jo Barrett is the founder of the Center for Contextual Change . She earned her master’s degree as a social worker from the Jane Addams School of Social Work and worked as a lecturer for the University of Chicago, the Chicago Center For Family Health and the Northwestern University Family Institute . Dr. Barrett was the Clinical Director of the Midwest Family Resource Center and has been working in the field of family violence since 1974, after a first collaboration with the Parents Anonymous association . Her latest book, co-written with Linda Stone Fish, is titled “Treating Complex Trauma: A Relational Blueprint for Collaboration and Change ”. She was also the co-author of two other books, co-authored with Terry Trepper: “ Incest: A Multiple Systems Perspective ” and “ The Systemic Treatment of Incest: A Therapeutic Handbook ”. Mary Jo Barrett created the Collaborative Change Model, a contextual model of treatment used to transform the lives of individuals affected by abuse and / or trauma. Her teachings and her publications focus mainly on: the Collaborative Change Model; family therapy and interpersonal violence; the treatment of adult survivors of abuse and trauma; the trauma of complex development; and the weariness caused by compassion (compassion fatigue ). Dr. Barrett also founded the Family Dialogue project , a mediation program aimed at redefining relationships within families affected by allegations of abuse or marked by apparently irreconcilable differences.

The Collaborative Change Model: a relational model that exploits the natural process of change

No two traumas are identical: the dynamics of interpersonal trauma and violence vary according to the specific situation. There are, however, some common variables. One of the key elements of complex developmental trauma is the fact that the trauma occurs within a relationship that should have been characterized by a healthy and protective attachment bond. Traumatic events lead the individual to have an experience of betrayal within the attachment relationship. This causes much of our customers’ attack / flight, freeze and surrender behaviors, creating serious difficulties for them. It was precisely the need to face these difficulties that led the world of psychotherapy to devise, in recent years, countless interventions and innovative treatment approaches. This presentation will describe the Collaborative Change Model (MCC), a contextual, relational and practical model, divided into three levels, which allows you to implement a cyclical treatment plan, based on the client’s strengths. MCC can be applied to any trauma treatment model as it takes advantage of the universal and recurring nature of change. The repetitive cycles of trauma will be analyzed and the conceptual framework of the Collaborative Change Model will be illustrated, based on the use of cycles of change within any treatment modality. MCC can be applied to any trauma treatment model as it takes advantage of the universal and recurring nature of change. The repetitive cycles of trauma will be analyzed and the conceptual framework of the Collaborative Change Model will be illustrated, based on the use of cycles of change within any treatment modality. MCC can be applied to any trauma treatment model as it takes advantage of the universal and recurring nature of change. The repetitive cycles of trauma will be analyzed and the conceptual framework of the Collaborative Change Model will be illustrated, based on the use of cycles of change within any treatment modality.

Diana Fosha

Diana Fosha, Ph.D. is the creator of AEDP ( Accelerated Experiential- Dynamic Psychotherapy ), as well as the founder and current director of the AEDP Institute, an internationally recognized school specializing in the training of therapists through a specific, transformative and healing-oriented approach to the treatment of attachment trauma. Over the past two decades, Diana Fosha has actively promoted a scientific basis for healing-oriented therapy focused on attachment, emotion and transformation. Undisputed leader in transformative studies on trauma treatment, Dr. Fosha’s work on transformative healing processes focuses on integrating scientific research on neuroplasticity, the recognition and dyadic development of clinical and experiential work with patients . In addition to having published numerous articles and written several chapters, Diana Fosha is the author of the book “The transforming power of affect: A model for accelerated change “ (Basic Books, 2000), whose Italian translation” The transformative power of emotion: a model of accelerated change “was published by ISC Editore in 2016. Furthermore, the Dr. Fosha was senior editor – together with Daniel Siegel and Marion Solomon – of the book “The healing power of emotion: Affective neuroscience, development & clinical practice”, as well as co-author, together with Natasha Prenn, of “Supervision essentials for Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy “(APA, 2016). Described by psychoanalyst James Grotstein as “a professional boxer fighting for intimacy” and by David Malan as “the Winnicott of [accelerated dynamic-experiential] psychotherapy”, Diana Fosha is known for her powerful, precise, but also poetic and evocative. Some of his phrases, such as “Overcoming loneliness”, “Existing in the heart and mind of the other”, “The Real Other”, “Explain all that is implicit and make experiential all that is explicit”, “Go beyond mirroring ”,“ Stay on this and stay with me ”,“ Shameless rigor ”and“ Judicious self-revelation ”, fully capture the ethos of the AEDP.

Stay on this, stay with me : dissolve loneliness and process the deep relational experience in an experiential way to transform the trauma

Loneliness in the face of overwhelming emotion is the epicenter of traumatic suffering, it is what drives patients to seek help. “Dissolving” the patient’s loneliness is essential to help him process the overwhelming emotions associated with the trauma. Accelerated Dynamic Experiential Psychotherapy (AEDP) – one of the fastest growing approaches to treating attachment trauma – has developed a series of creative and systematic interventions to achieve exactly this goal: to dissolve the patient’s loneliness and work at the dyadic level. to heal the emotional pain. Unlike psychopathology-based treatment models, AEDP is grounded in a transformative, change-based theory of therapeutic action. A model of the transformative process divided into 4 states and a descriptive and specific transformative phenomenology for each state guide the moment-by-moment decision-making process in the clinical setting. The AEDP methodology also requires the patient and therapist to be emotionally involved, to carefully follow the emergence of new relational and transformative experiences and, at the same time, to process the trauma. The AEDP takes a courageous approach to working with the experience of patient-therapist attachment: the latter is monitored moment by moment and rigorously processed. An essential element for the restructuring of relational experiences is constituted by meta-processing techniques (or The AEDP methodology also requires the patient and therapist to be emotionally involved, to carefully follow the emergence of new relational and transformative experiences and, at the same time, to process the trauma. The AEDP takes a courageous approach to working with the experience of patient-therapist attachment: the latter is monitored moment by moment and rigorously processed. An essential element for the restructuring of relational experiences is constituted by meta-processing techniques (or The AEDP methodology also requires the patient and therapist to be emotionally involved, to carefully follow the emergence of new relational and transformative experiences and, at the same time, to process the trauma. The AEDP takes a courageous approach to working with the experience of patient-therapist attachment: the latter is monitored moment by moment and rigorously processed. An essential element for the restructuring of relational experiences is constituted by meta-processing techniques (or the latter is monitored moment by moment and rigorously processed. An essential element for the restructuring of relational experiences is constituted by meta-processing techniques (or the latter is monitored moment by moment and rigorously processed. An essential element for the restructuring of relational experiences is constituted by meta-processing techniques (ormetaprocessing) relational through which the AEDP systematically processes the relational experiences within the session. The latter are used to expand the patient’s relational capacity and deepen the receptive affective experience of feeling safe, seen, helped and changed. Using footage from real psychotherapy sessions, Diana Fosha will demonstrate how to apply relationship meta-processing to clinical practice with a trauma patient. She will also show how to work with the relational experience during the session, conducting a work that is as systematic and profound as that carried out with other types of emotional experiences. The aim is to help patients live – and focus on – the affective experiences associated with the feeling of being seen, loved and cared for, experiences that emerge from therapeutic work. By processing the relational experience and working directly with the patient’s experiences of attachment and intersubjectivity, the AEDP therapist promotes new emotional experiences lived in connection, which modify the internal working models and support the emergence of a vital, animated and relational self. involved. The empirical results from the studies on the trans-diagnostic efficacy of AEDP – based on data from over 75 therapeutic dyads within the AEDP network of therapists and researchers around the world ( the AEDP therapist promotes new emotional experiences lived in connection, which modify the internal working models and support the emergence of a vital, animated and relationally involved self. The empirical results from the studies on the trans-diagnostic efficacy of AEDP – based on data from over 75 therapeutic dyads within the AEDP network of therapists and researchers around the world ( the AEDP therapist promotes new emotional experiences lived in connection, which modify the internal working models and support the emergence of a vital, animated and relationally involved self. The empirical results from the studies on the trans-diagnostic efficacy of AEDP – based on data from over 75 therapeutic dyads within the AEDP network of therapists and researchers around the world (Practitioner-Researcher Network or PNR) – will be presented during the speech.

Roger Solomon

Dr. Roger Solomon is a psychologist specializing in the treatment of trauma and bereavement. He holds the position of Program Director and Senior Faculty within the EMDR Instituteand teaches EMDR therapy internationally. He also works as a consultant for the US Senate and has advised law enforcement and other US government agencies, including the FBI, the Secret Service, NASA, the Federal Prosecutor’s Office and the US Army. . In Italy, Dr. Solomon collaborates, as a consultant, both with the State Police and with the University of Rome (La Sapienza), and is a guest professor at the Salesian University in Rome. Over the past 15 years, he has mainly focused on the use of EMDR therapy for the treatment of complex PTSD and trauma-related dissociation, following the principles of the Structural Dissociation Theory of Personality. Dr.

Desensitization and reworking through eye movements (EMDR) and traumatic attachment ( online intervention )

EMDR therapy is an evidence-based therapeutic approach for trauma treatment. According to the adaptive information processing model, which guides the EMDR approach, the symptoms presented by the client originate from painful experiences that are maladaptively stored in the brain, without having been fully processed and integrated within the wider memory network (Shapiro, 1995, 2001, 2018). EMDR therapy is an eight-step method that involves processing the memories of the past at the origin of the problems manifested in the present, as well as the triggers that activate the client in the present; this method also involves the creation of a future model (or template) of adaptive behavior. EMDR can be used not only to treat more severe trauma, but also to treat those “seemingly small” but rather impactful omnipresent memories (eg a mother’s angry look, a father’s ignored call for help). These memories are the basis of various negative beliefs: “I am not enough”, “I do not deserve to be loved”, “I am helpless” or “I am not safe” are just a few examples. Disorganized attachment occurs when the caregiver is both a source of safety and terror; this form of attachment is at the origin of complex PTSD and dissociative disorders (Brown and Elliot, 2018). Trauma (abuse or neglect suffered) is not the only aspect to be treated: traumatic attachment to the abusive figure must also be adequately treated. EMDR can be used for both trauma treatment and traumatic attachment treatment. This presentation will illustrate the basic principles of EMDR therapy and discuss the therapeutic treatment of traumatic attachment in clients who have experienced sexual abuse. The treatment principles will also be illustrated through specific clinical films.

Vincenzo Caretti

Vincenzo Caretti is a clinical psychologist, psychoanalyst and full professor of Dynamic Psychology at LUMSA in Rome. Director of the 2nd level Master in ‘Clinical Criminology and Forensic Sciences’ of LUMSA in Rome; Director of Forma Mentis, School of Specialization in Integrated Psychodynamic Psychotherapy of the Agostino Gemelli Polyclinic Hospital in Rome; Director of the Italian Institute of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (IIPP) in Palermo. His research has covered over time: alexithymia, developmental trauma, psychopathic personality, the applications of the polyvagal theory in the psychosomatic approach in psychotherapy. Author of numerous publications, he has standardized psychometric tests and semi-structured interviews such as PDSS, ABQ, PDI, PCL-R and HCRv3, which are commonly used in assessment and clinical practice.

Psychotherapy of emotional and psychosomatic regulation

The Psychotherapy of Emotional and Psychosomatic Regulation ( Self-Regulation Psychotherapy ) is an integrated psychotherapy,  body trauma oriented  in which the dynamic model integrates with the cognitive-behavioral and psychosomatic ones, whose goal is the treatment of emotions (Mind) and of the patient’s dysregulated sensations (Body), in favor of mentalization and psycho-somatic regulation for his greater autonomy both in being with himself and in his interpersonal and attachment relationships.

The dysregulation of the patient’s emotions has an evolutionary origin in the traumas that have intervened in his system of primary relationships and which, as they are not elaborated, are unconsciously repeated in the behavioral patterns and in the dysfunctional automatisms, even bodily ones of attack-flight-immobilization, in the here and now of the patient, or in the compulsion to repeat.

The integrated psychotherapy of emotional regulation is aimed at transforming the dysfunctional emotional states and negative sensations in the patient’s present ( self-regulation ), with others more functional at the service of his well-being and new interpersonal skills in social engagement, allowing the patient to progressively move from a closed relational system to an open and secure relational system. The clinical process of emotional and psychosomatic regulation is a relational process aimed at the maturation of the patient ( body-mind insight ) and fundamentally based on the therapist’s emotional and somatic regulation in the course of building, breaking and repairing the therapeutic alliance.

Elizabeth Warner

Elizabeth Warner is a Psychologist with over 40 years of experience working with children and families, both in a variety of mental disorder treatment settings and with clients in her private practice. Since the beginning of her career, she has always used innovative treatment methodologies, such as the Miller Method, carrying out a trial study on therapy with children with autism and other serious disorders. Over the past 12 years, she has mainly focused on devising an innovative treatment method aimed at children and young adults (from 1.5 years up to 22 years old) affected by chronic stress and complex trauma, as well as their caregiver. For 10 years, she as project director at the Trauma Center delJustice Resource Institute (JRI), oversaw the development of the SMART ( Sensory Motor Arousal Regulation Treatment) aimed at non-hospitalized patients, community therapists, patients attending day care centers and patients in residential treatment programs. In addition to training and advising therapists in the United States, Canada and Hong Kong, Dr. Warner has developed two video coding systems aimed at studying the regulatory processes within the treatment with the SMART method. As a founding partner of SMARTMoves LLC, you continue to carry out training and consultancy activities aimed at mental health professionals; in addition, she is starting to apply the SMART method to the early treatment of traumatized young parents and their very young children, as well as to therapy with adults. Dr. Warner runs a private practice in Brookline, Massachusetts, within which she deals with Psychotherapy with adults and parenting counseling. Finally, she is the co-author of the book “Transforming Trauma in Children and Adolescents: An Embodied Approach to Somatic Regulation, Trauma Processing, and Attachment-Building “, published in 2020.

The Transformation of Trauma in Children and Adolescents: An Embodied Approach to Somatic Regulation, Trauma Processing, and Attachment Building

Children and adolescents with histories of complex developmental trauma, with their behavioral and emotional dysregulation, can challenge even the most experienced therapists, as well as their families, schools and communities to which they belong. Occupational therapy centered on sensory integration has offered a team of therapists specialized in the treatment of trauma interesting and effective tools to regulate – but also a different “lens” through which to observe – the states of hyperactivity and shutdown .of traumatized children. The use of this new method, combined with that of a specially designed room, made it possible to accelerate the processes of co-regulation and self-regulation within the therapeutic sessions, subsequently leading the child / adolescent to spontaneously express and process – with adequate support – the traumatic experience, both on a body and symbolic level; the organic nature with which this process was manifested during the therapeutic sessions was a source of great surprise for the therapists. Furthermore, the child’s accessibility in terms of social involvement, the sense of connection with the therapist and the opportunity to co-create new rhythms of interaction through sensory-motor play, they have considerably facilitated the work aimed at creating a “sufficiently safe” therapeutic relationship. The study of a case related to the use of this form of trauma therapy will illustrate – through videos taken from sessions with a small child – these therapeutic processes. Video recording of sessions is an essential tool for therapists using this model of trauma therapy, a model that entrusts the client’s regulation to body-centered processes, rather than to verbal or symbolic processes. In this regard, the clinical data collected allow us to hypothesize that the so-called regulation ” The study of a case related to the use of this form of trauma therapy will illustrate – through videos taken from sessions with a small child – these therapeutic processes. Video recording of sessions is an essential tool for therapists using this model of trauma therapy, a model that entrusts the client’s regulation to body-centered processes, rather than to verbal or symbolic processes. In this regard, the clinical data collected allow us to hypothesize that the so-called regulation ” The study of a case related to the use of this form of trauma therapy will illustrate – through videos taken from sessions with a small child – these therapeutic processes. Video recording of sessions is an essential tool for therapists using this model of trauma therapy, a model that entrusts the client’s regulation to body-centered processes, rather than to verbal or symbolic processes. In this regard, the clinical data collected allow us to hypothesize that the so-called regulation “bottom-up ”(or somatic) is the neurobiological prerequisite of behavioral, emotional, cognitive regulation and a profound sense of self.

Jonathan Baylin

Jonathan Baylin received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Peabody College at Vanderbilt Universityin 1981. Over the past twenty years he has devoted himself extensively, alongside his clinical activity, to the study of neuroscience, helping hundreds of mental health professionals to deepen their knowledge of brain functioning. In this regard, Dr. Baylin has held numerous workshops focused on the integration between Psychotherapy and Neuroscience and has participated as a speaker at various conferences – both national and international – in the field of childhood trauma and attachment. For years, Dr. Baylin has also been actively collaborating with Daniel Hughes, one of the leading experts in the field of therapy focused on attachment; their first book, ” Brain-Based Parenting “, published by Norton, was published in 2012. Their second book, “The Neurobiology of Attachment-focused Therapy ”, also published by Norton, was published in 2016. Both publications are part of the series of volumes published by Norton in the field of Interpersonal Neurobiology.

Reverse relationship learning: a neuroscientific approach to help wary children trust carers
In this presentation, Dr. Baylin will illustrate how the neuroscientific underpinnings of relational neuroception – that is, the preconscious recognition of the trustworthiness of others – and the science of reversal learning can help therapists and  caregivers  understand how to build trust with children who have experienced early trauma. Participants will learn how to send safety messages within the relational neuroceptive window to foster the necessary reverse learning, thus facilitating the transition from distrust to trust.

 

Skip Rizzo

Skip Rizzo is a Psychologist specialized in research on the design, development and evaluation of virtual reality (VR) systems that affect the areas of clinical assessment , therapeutic rehabilitation and resilience. His work focuses mainly on aspects related to psychological, cognitive and motor functioning, both in the healthy and in the clinical population. Thanks to the development of a PTSD treatment approach based on the use of an integrated exposure therapy to virtual reality, he received, in 2010, an award for the important contributions in the field of trauma therapy, conferred by the American Psychological Association. Rizzo is also associate director for the use of virtual reality in the medical field of the Institute for Creative Technologies of the University of Southern California (USC); he also holds the role of research professor within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Davis School of Gerontology, also at USC. Rizzo currently collaborates with a team committed to creating virtual patients using artificial intelligence that therapists can use to acquire the skills necessary to conduct clinical interviews and carry out diagnostic assessments. His work in the cognitive field mainly concerns the use of VR applications to test and exercise attention, memory, visuospatial skills and executive function. Currently, he is also involved in the design of VR scenarios aimed at managing social and professional interactions in subjects with an autism spectrum disorder. His research also analyzes the possible use of virtual reality applications to facilitate the acquisition of coping skillsemotional in the military, with the aim of preparing them to better manage the stress of fighting.

Virtual reality and new advances in the prevention, assessment and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder

War is perhaps one of the most complex situations a human being can find himself in. The physical, emotional, cognitive and psychological demands of an environment in which armed confrontations take place create enormous stress on the individual, even on highly trained military personnel. Numerous reports indicate that the incidence of post-traumatic stress in military personnel returning from Afghanistan and Iraq ( Operation Enduring Freedom  – OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom – OIF) is creating a considerable challenge for the American health system. This situation has served to fund research studies on how to further develop and disseminate evidence-based treatmentsfor post-traumatic stress and other psycho-social disorders. In this regard, virtual reality exposure therapy is one of the approaches currently used for the treatment of post-traumatic stress; initial reports showed outcomesof positive treatment. This presentation will describe how virtual reality applications implemented at different stages of the military deployment cycle are designed to prevent, identify and treat post-traumatic stress associated with armed confrontation and / or sexual trauma in serving military and veterans. of the OIF / OEF missions. Skip Rizzo will also illustrate his recent work in the field of artificial intelligence, aimed at creating virtual human beings that act as “virtual patients” for the clinical training of professionals operating in both military and civil settings, offering guidance online to remove barriers to treatment. These projects were developed by Dr. Rizzo in collaboration with the Institute for Creative Technologies ofUniversity of Southern California , one of the United States Army-affiliated research centers. Rizzo will offer a complete and heterogeneous overview of the use of virtual reality in the context of exposure therapy, the assessment of PTSD and cognitive functioning, the development of resilience to stress before each military mission and the overcoming of barriers to care. Finally, the speech will underline how much the urgencies of war have contributed to providing the context and funding necessary to advance these technologies, which will soon be able to be implemented also to meet the needs of civilians.

Alessandro Carmelita and Marina Cirio

Psychologist and Psychotherapist, Alessandro Carmelita trained with some of the leading experts in the field of Psychotherapy and Interpersonal Neurobiology. He created Mindful Interbeing Mirror Therapy (MIMT) and, together with Marina Cirio, developed its clinical aspects. Currently, he is actively involved in spreading this new, revolutionary, therapeutic approach.

 

Psychologist and Psychotherapist, Marina Cirio has enriched her training with recent contributions in the psychotherapeutic and neuroscientific fields. You have developed, together with Alessandro Carmelita, the MIMT, deepening its clinical and research aspects with respect to the intervention with different types of patients. She has been using this innovative approach for years and participates in the training of new therapists, helping them to understand this powerful way of relating with the patient, promoting a real and profound change.

Mindful Interbeing Mirror Therapy : Beyond Trauma Healing

The study of human personality has shed light on the undeniable impact that attachment relationships, as well as early traumatic experiences – and the resulting dissociation – have on the construction of the self. Psychological suffering can be analyzed from two different but interconnected perspectives: on the one hand, the level of integration of the self and, on the other, the individual’s ability to interact with the external world. Based on this promise, identifying and defining the different parts of the client’s personality – especially if the client has a history of trauma and presents severe symptoms at the start of therapy – becomes particularly important. Psychotherapy is increasingly conceived, in fact, as a series of interventions aimed at integrating the dissociated parts of the client’s personality, to help the latter build a unified Self. At the same time, the therapeutic relationship plays a central role in the treatment of dissociation caused by early relational trauma, regardless of their severity. ThereMindful Interbeing Mirror Therapy(MIMT) is a completely innovative therapeutic approach, based on the use of the mirror within the therapeutic setting. The mirror, placed in front of both the client and the therapist, allows them to interact through their own reflected image. The validity of this modality of intervention is supported by a series of theoretical foundations, which include not only the most recent research studies in the neuroscientific field, but also a series of effective clinical studies. The construction of the individual’s self and relational reality – starting from the very principle of the identity construction process, i.e. the ability to identify one’s own image in the mirror, up to the ability to recognize the emotional states of others – are two processes parallels that characterize the development of every human being. MIMT can therefore be seen as a unique combination of therapeutic interventions aimed at helping the client to rebuild an integrated self, while working on the relationship with the other. Over the past five years, theMindful Interbeing Mirror Therapy has been studied in depth and a specific intervention procedure has been created. Furthermore, thanks to MIMT, many therapists have discovered a new, extremely fast way to connect with the client, as well as an effective approach to help the client integrate parts of their self through deep and transformative self-compassion . The theoretical aspects and practical applications related to this innovative therapeutic approach offer new opportunities for intervention that the Research will continue to support and validate.

Ronald D. Siegel

Ronald D. Siegel is  Assistant Professor  of Psychology at  Harvard Medical School , where he has taught for over 35 years. He has been studying the practice of  Mindful  Meditation for years and is on the steering committee of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy . In addition to running the clinical practice of his private practice in Lincoln, Massachusetts, Dr. Siegel teaches several courses each year, internationally, on the application of  Mindfulness  to Psychotherapy and other fields. Dr. Siegel is also co-editor of the critically acclaimed text ” Mindfulness and Psychotherapy ” (second edition), as well as the author of a specific manual on mindfulness  aimed at the general public, ” The Mindfulness Solution: Everyday Practices for Everyday Problems “. In addition, he is co-editor of the text ” Wisdom and Compassion in Psychotherapy”,  co-author of the guide for mental health professionals ” Sitting Together: Essential Skills for Mindfulness-Based Psychotherapy”  and co-author of the self-treatment manual ” Back Sense ” , which integrates Western and Eastern approaches related to the treatment of chronic back pain. Finally, he collaborated in the realization of ” The Science of Mindfulness: A Research-Based Path to Well-Being “, produced by  The Great Courses. Dr. Siegel continues to contribute regularly to other professional publications and is co-director of the annual Congress on Meditation and Psychotherapy organized by  Harvard Medical School .

Mindfulness and compassion in the treatment of trauma: adapting the practice to the person

If Mindfulness -Based Psychotherapy has become one of the most popular new treatment approaches over the past decade, there is a good reason: Mindfulness related practices.and compassion are not only very promising for personal development and growth, but are also particularly powerful tools for psychotherapy, capable of making virtually any form of treatment more effective. However, these practices cannot be considered a one-size-fits-all remedy. Today, researchers are differentiating the effects of each of them, from focused attention to open monitoring, from loving kindness to compassion and equanimity. These practices need to be tailored to meet the needs of individuals and this presentation will show you how to do this. Ronald Siegel will analyze the most important clinical decisions to be considered when and if the therapist decides to introduce this kind of practice in the treatment of clients with different needs. After understanding what are the constituent elements of theMindfulness and compassion and how they act to alleviate psychological distress, participants will learn to adapt these practices creatively, tailoring them to the specific needs of clients and their condition, especially when the latter present stories of unresolved trauma. Dr. Siegel will offer a comprehensive overview of the contraindications, as well as the potential psychotherapeutic benefits, of various techniques related to mindfulness and compassion.

Christiane Sanderson

Christiane Sanderson is Professor of Psychology at the University of Roehampton . For over three decades, Dr. Sanderson has worked with survivors of childhood sexual abuse and has been involved in interpersonal trauma and domestic abuse. You have worked as a consultant and trainer in various contexts, supporting parents, teachers, social workers, nurses, therapists, counselors and lawyers; you have also collaborated with various entities including the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Committee , the Methodist Church, the Metropolitan Police Service , the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NPCC), the Refugee Counciland also worked in detention centers. Dr. Sanderson is the author of numerous books, including: ” Counseling Skills for Working with Shame “; “ Counseling Skills for Working with Trauma: Healing from Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Violence and Domestic Abuse ”; “ Introduction of Counseling Survivors of Interpersonal Trauma ”; ” Counseling Survivors of Domestic Abuse “; “ Counseling Adult Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse ” (third edition); ” The Seduction of Children: Empowering Parents and Teachers to Protect Children from Child Sexual Abuse “, published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers . To these volumes are also added: “The Warrior Within: A One in Four Handbook to Aid Recovery from Childhood Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence ”; ” The Spirit Within: A One in Four Handbook to Aid Recovery from Religious Sexual Abuse Across All Faiths “; ” Responding to Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse: A pocket guide for professionals, partners, families and friends ” and ” Numbing the Pain: A pocket guide for professionals supporting survivors of childhood sexual abuse and addiction “, published by the One in Four association .

 

Take an informed approach to trauma in working with survivors of childhood sexual abuse

Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse (ASI) are usually terrified of closeness and intimacy; furthermore, they may be wary of attachment ties as they seek to protect themselves by becoming overly independent and self-reliant or, conversely, overly dependent. All this makes it extremely difficult to establish a good therapeutic relationship with this type of client. This presentation will illustrate the different factors that inhibit attachment, such as traumatic bonding, dissociation, shame, fear and abandonment. The persistence of hyper or hypo-activation of attachment systems and concomitant traumatic symptoms, as well as the relational difficulties of these clients, requires greater awareness on the part of the therapist, with respect to the impact of trauma on attachment, on the development of a sense of self and on the person’s future relationships. To learn how to work wisely with traumatized clients, clinicians can draw on highly useful resources, such as the PTM model (Power Threat Meaning Framework ) and the fundamentals of trauma-informed therapy. This will allow therapists to analyze the impact of ASI through the lens of trauma, focusing on ” what happened to the child ” rather than ” what is wrong with the adult survivor .”, As well as to begin to consider symptoms as necessary adaptations to survive a prolonged and inescapable threat. The presentation will mainly focus on the use of trauma-informed therapy and the triphasic model of trauma recovery as a “framework” able to support clinicians in applying their preferred therapeutic model, helping them to manage traumatic symptoms, to minimize the replication of the dynamics of power and control and to manage relational inhibitors within the therapeutic relationship, in order to reduce the distance and facilitate the connection with the client. Acquiring this knowledge will allow participants to create a respectful, coherent, collaborative and non-hierarchical therapeutic space,

Deb Dana

Deb Dana, LCSW, is a physician and consultant specializing in the treatment of complex trauma. Appointed Coordinator of the Kinsey Institute ‘s Traumatic Stress Research Consortium , Dr. Dana is an internationally acclaimed speaker whose therapeutic approach – centered on polyvagal theory and indicated for working with trauma survivors – has been illustrated in several countries. She deb Dana has also devised a specific model of clinical training, to which she has given the name of Rhythm of Regulation . Finally, she is the author of the following volumes: ” The Polyvagal Theory in Therapy: Engaging the Rhythm of Regulation ” and “Clinical Applications of the Polyvagal Theory: The Emergence of Polyvagal-Informed Therapies ”, co-written with Stephen Porges. For more information, you can visit his website rhythmofregulation.com.

In search of connection: a therapeutic approach based on the Polyvagal Theory ( online intervention )

The autonomic nervous system is at the center of our daily life and has a powerful impact on safety-related experiences, affecting our ability to connect. The Polyvagal Theory offers an exhaustive guide of the autonomic circuits from which our behaviors and beliefs arise, allowing us to understand which are the neural pathways that, connecting the body to the brain, give rise to our personal stories in terms of safety and survival. . During this presentation, Deb Dana will use a r oadmappolyvagal to explore different ways of listening – with curiosity and compassion – to the emerging autonomic states, answering the fundamental question: “What does the nervous system need at this moment to detect the security within the connection?”.

Partner Hotels

Here is a list of all the hotels and B & Bs in Rome that offer a discounted rate to participants.
In order to take advantage of the agreements it is necessary to communicate, at the time of booking, the participation at the Auditorium Antonianum congress center.

HOTEL MILTON ROME **** www.miltonroma.com

Via Emanuele Filiberto, 155 Tel: 0677207325

E-mail: g.morelli@hotelmilton.com

Contact person: Gianluca Morelli

To access the special rates click on the hotel link:

www.hotelmiltonroma.com 
and insert the Promo code: auditorium NB. For group bookings, please contact the property directly.

MERCURE ROME COLOSSEUM CENTER **** www.mercure.com

Via Labicana, 144 – 00184 Rome Tel: 06770021

E-mail: 
h2909-re@accor.com
Contact person: Viviana Di Giulio

Reference code in the case of an e-mail request: AUDITORIUM

HOTEL SAINT JOHN ROME ****
www.eurostarssaintjohn.com

Via Matteo Boiardo, 30 – 00185 Rome Tel: 0697997045

E-mail fom@hotelsaintjohn.it

DOUBLETREE by Hilton Rome Monti www.hiltonhotels.it/italia/doubletree-by-hilton-rome-monti/ Piazza dell’Esquilino, 1 – 00185 – Rome – Tel. 0645774500 E-mail: alessia.consiglio2@hilton.com

RELAIS MERULANA – GUEST HOUSE www.relaismerulana.com

Piazza Gondar, 14 – Tel 0645551913

E-mail 
relaismerulana@gmail.com

COLOSSHOUSE GUEST HOUSE
www.colosshouse-guest-house-it

Via Ariosto, 24 – 00185 Rome – Tel 3911103615

E-mail colosshouse@gmail.com

Ready to Book?

Attachment and Trauma: Effective Clinical Interventions and Research

In Person Congress in Rome
(+ streamed online)
30 September - 2 October 2022

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