The digital recording will be released to all participants on the 23rd January. The recording and associated resources will then be accessible through your Essential Therapy Training account for 365 days.

 

Coercive Control, Physical and Sexual Violence in Intimate Relationships: Understanding the Spectrum of Domestic Abuse - Christiane Sanderson

PRICE

£99.00

DATE

21 January 2023 Live & On Demand

TIME

UK: 11:30 – 18:30
North America: 6:30 – 13:30 ET / 3:30 – 10:30 PT

CPD/CE credits

6
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The digital recording will be released to all participants on the 23rd January. The recording and associated resources will then be accessible through your Essential Therapy Training account for 365 days.

 

The level of reported cases of Domestic Abuse (DA) increased significantly during the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown, with some DA charities recording a  66%  increase in calls to helplines. In addition, the number of women murdered during lockdown has also risen above the average of two women a week  murdered by their partner or ex-partner. While much of the clinical literature focuses on physical violence in domestic abuse (DA), there is increasing evidence that there are more subtle and covert forms of abuse in which  power and control is used to  coerce  and emotionally abuse partners in intimate relationships. This workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to enhance our comprehension of the spectrum of DA, its impact and long term effects on survivors. It will also examine how, as practitioners, we can work effectively using the principles of the Power Threat Meaning Framework and Trauma Informed Practice, psychoeducation and stabilisation to restore control and to allow for the processing of the DA narrative.

To understand the spectrum of DA the workshop  will look at small subtle yet incremental forms  of coercive and controlling behaviour such as ‘love bombing, ‘gaslighting’, thought control, deception, and lying  to distort reality to gain control over the partner and make it hard to legitimise the abuse. The focus will be on the dynamics of coercive and controlling and emotional abuse and how the use of blame, shame and humiliation silences those who are being domestically abused.

The workshop will also explore how these more subtle forms of abuse can precede a range of domestically abusive behaviours use of physical force, sexual violence, financial abuse, spiritual abuse and revenge porn, and identify those most at risk of DA. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the processes involved in DA such as grooming victims, the cycle of abuse, the role of dissociation and thought blindness that supports the trauma bond which binds the couple.  The aim is to understand the role of attachment and fear of abandonment that underpins much of DA and how this manifests relationally both for the couple and practitioners working with DA. We also look at the importance of the therapeutic relationship in restoring relational worth, mitigating the de-humanising effects of DA and restoring autonomy and self-agency.

Conceptualising DA within the complex trauma framework, we consider the processing of the DA narrative and the facilitation of post traumatic growth. By identifying the challenges of working with DA and introducing a range of therapeutic skills, practitioners will feel more equipped when working with survivors of DA and enhance their comprehension of the transformative effects of post traumatic growth for both clients and practitioners.

TRAINING information

The level of reported cases of Domestic Abuse (DA) increased significantly during the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown, with some DA charities recording a  66%  increase in calls to helplines. In addition, the number of women murdered during lockdown has also risen above the average of two women a week  murdered by their partner or ex-partner. While much of the clinical literature focuses on physical violence in domestic abuse (DA), there is increasing evidence that there are more subtle and covert forms of abuse in which  power and control is used to  coerce  and emotionally abuse partners in intimate relationships. This workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to enhance our comprehension of the spectrum of DA, its impact and long term effects on survivors. It will also examine how, as practitioners, we can work effectively using the principles of the Power Threat Meaning Framework and Trauma Informed Practice, psychoeducation and stabilisation to restore control and to allow for the processing of the DA narrative.

To understand the spectrum of DA the workshop  will look at small subtle yet incremental forms  of coercive and controlling behaviour such as ‘love bombing, ‘gaslighting’, thought control, deception, and lying  to distort reality to gain control over the partner and make it hard to legitimise the abuse. The focus will be on the dynamics of coercive and controlling and emotional abuse and how the use of blame, shame and humiliation silences those who are being domestically abused.

The workshop will also explore how these more subtle forms of abuse can precede a range of domestically abusive behaviours use of physical force, sexual violence, financial abuse, spiritual abuse and revenge porn, and identify those most at risk of DA. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the processes involved in DA such as grooming victims, the cycle of abuse, the role of dissociation and thought blindness that supports the trauma bond which binds the couple.  The aim is to understand the role of attachment and fear of abandonment that underpins much of DA and how this manifests relationally both for the couple and practitioners working with DA. We also look at the importance of the therapeutic relationship in restoring relational worth, mitigating the de-humanising effects of DA and restoring autonomy and self-agency.

Conceptualising DA within the complex trauma framework, we consider the processing of the DA narrative and the facilitation of post traumatic growth. By identifying the challenges of working with DA and introducing a range of therapeutic skills, practitioners will feel more equipped when working with survivors of DA and enhance their comprehension of the transformative effects of post traumatic growth for both clients and practitioners.

Learning Objectives

Specifically, we will consider:

  • The nature and dynamics of DA, such as the role of charm and love bombing, gaslighting and deception is used to entice victims,
  • The nature of coercive and controlling behaviour, the use of thought control and thought blindness to distort reality that facilitates the trauma bond and the role of silence, secrecy and shame
  • The intergenerational transmission of DA through attachment and relational deficits
  • The characteristics of male and female perpetrators
  • DA as complex trauma and its psychobiological impact
  • The long term effects of DA on partners, and children
  • Obstacles to leaving an abusive relationship
  • The importance of developing safety plans when leaving
  • The principles of the power threat meaning framework  and trauma informed practice model when working with survivors of DA
  • The role of the therapeutic relationship inrestoring power and control, autonomy, choice and self-agency
  • The impact of working with DA on practitioners and the role of self-care

About the Speaker

Christiane Sanderson is retired senior lecturer in Psychology at the University of Roehampton. With over 35 years’ experience working in the field of  childhood sexual abuse interpersonal trauma and domestic abuse. She is the author of Counselling Skills for Working with Shame, Counselling Skills for Working with Trauma:Healing from Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Violence and Domestic AbuseIntroduction of Counselling Survivors of Interpersonal Trauma,  Counselling Survivors of Domestic Abuse, Counselling Adult Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse 3rd Edition, The Seduction of Children: Empowering Parents and Teachers to Protect Children from Child Sexual Abuse; The Hidden Taboo of Sibling Sexual Abuse: Working with Adult Survivors and The Warrior Within: A One in Four Handbook to Aid Recovery from Childhood Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence, The Spirit Within: A One in Four Handbook to Aid Recovery from Religious Sexual Abuse Across All Faiths, Responding to Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse: A pocket guide for professionals, partners, families and friends and Numbing the Pain: A pocket guide for professionals supporting survivors of childhood sexual abuse and addiction.

CPD/CE

CPD & CE credits available: 6

How do I receive these credits?

The participant must pass the multiple-choice test with a minimum score of 80%. There is a maximum of three attempts to achieve this.

The post-test is included in the price of the training.

Does my regulatory body accept the credits?

The CPD & CE credits awarded can be used towards your declaration to any governing regulatory body in your state or country, provided the content is relevant to your discipline.

Our trainings are accredited by:

– The CPD Group, London
– Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association
– Australian Counselling Association
– National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC)

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Coercive Control, Physical and Sexual Violence in Intimate Relationships: Understanding the Spectrum of Domestic Abuse - Christiane Sanderson

21 January 2023 Live & On Demand

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